Visible Person Project

To me, the core of that attraction is that she is a better reporter than he is. Think about being Superman for a second. The Olympic record for weightlifting is 1,038 lbs., but you could lift more than that as a child. The record for the 100 meter dash is 9.58 seconds, but you can travel over 51 miles in that time. Going to Vegas? You don’t need your X-Ray vision to win at Blackjack, because you can just count the cards while holding down a conversation about nuclear physics. Without really trying, you are better at just about everything than anyone else in the world.

However, (as Mark Waid once pointed out in a podcast with Marv Wolfman) none of that really translates to your chosen profession. Typing really fast does not help your prose. Being able to lift a tank does not help you convince a source to go on record. It is as near to competing straight up with normal people as Superman would ever be capable of. Even then, it comes easily enough to him that you get a pretty lofty perch at a great paper very early in your career. It is just in this one context, there is someone better than you are: Lois Lane.

As mild-mannered reporter Clark Kent, you reach up for the first time in your life and she rejects you.

To me, it is an inversion of the Luthor story. Luthor sees someone above him and feels hate. Superman sees someone above him and feels love.

Dean Hacker, comment on “Giving Lois Lane A Second Look, For The First Time” by Kelly Thompson (CBR: She Has No Head!)

#GoLois

(via wickedjunkie)

scribblekin:

soveryanon:

CASUALLY SHARING THE SAME APPLE

haven’t watched this yet so completely out of context, but this shot in particular has me screaming because

fawnling:

image

You’re probably familiar with the popular animation “Bee and Puppycat” a one episode, ten minute production created by Natasha Allegri that follows the exploits of a newly unemployed, 20 something young woman named Bee and a half-cat half-dog creature, astutely enough called Puppycat. This…

beyonce's publishing team: how are we going to promote your new album
beyonce: i'm beyonce
beyonce's publishing team: tru
voxlunch:

Cool Misogyny BroNow take that shirt off and burn it
Pax prime this year was one of the peak experiences of my life. I met a lot of wonderful people, saw a lot of incredible things and generally really enjoyed myself. So try to imagine my frustration when I was eagerly editing together the Loading Time footage for the event and found this.
I had no memory of this person amid the gigantic crowds, but there he was in 1080p on my timeline. The shirt isn’t funny. He is an asshole for wearing it, and the people who made it are even bigger assholes for creating and profiting from it. This is the face of casual sexism and one of the shittiest things about nerd culture and human culture in general.
There is a subtlety to this particular flavor of misogyny that allows it to pass through social situations like this one undetected or without raising much notice. I feel that the average person might glance at this and frown, or mutter under their breath, or tell their friend to check out the huge douchebag before moving on to their next con destination.
This is the reason made this blog post and did not censor this person’s face. Casual sexism needs to be hauled into the light and shown for what it is. It must be highlighted, underlined, thrown up in big block letters so everyone can see and know that it’s there, that it sucks, and that it has to be destroyed. It is my sincere hope that this image spreads throughout the internet and whoever this is sees it. I hope they feel the full weight of every like and repost bearing down on them, and I hope they come to understand that they fucked up. I hope they sheepishly take that offensive scrap of cloth out to their backyard and give it a viking funeral before turning a new corner in their life.
Shirt guy, I am calling you the fuck out.

voxlunch:

Cool Misogyny Bro
Now take that shirt off and burn it


Pax prime this year was one of the peak experiences of my life. I met a lot of wonderful people, saw a lot of incredible things and generally really enjoyed myself. So try to imagine my frustration when I was eagerly editing together the Loading Time footage for the event and found this.

I had no memory of this person amid the gigantic crowds, but there he was in 1080p on my timeline. The shirt isn’t funny. He is an asshole for wearing it, and the people who made it are even bigger assholes for creating and profiting from it. This is the face of casual sexism and one of the shittiest things about nerd culture and human culture in general.

There is a subtlety to this particular flavor of misogyny that allows it to pass through social situations like this one undetected or without raising much notice. I feel that the average person might glance at this and frown, or mutter under their breath, or tell their friend to check out the huge douchebag before moving on to their next con destination.

This is the reason made this blog post and did not censor this person’s face. Casual sexism needs to be hauled into the light and shown for what it is. It must be highlighted, underlined, thrown up in big block letters so everyone can see and know that it’s there, that it sucks, and that it has to be destroyed. It is my sincere hope that this image spreads throughout the internet and whoever this is sees it. I hope they feel the full weight of every like and repost bearing down on them, and I hope they come to understand that they fucked up. I hope they sheepishly take that offensive scrap of cloth out to their backyard and give it a viking funeral before turning a new corner in their life.

Shirt guy, I am calling you the fuck out.

Remember Me - Episode 3
superseventies:

Lita Ford

superseventies:

Lita Ford

An email to @Ariadnex about Rape Culture and assoc. ideas

So, to have us on the same page here’s the things that have me thinking about this at the moment:

The “rape instruction manual” that got funded on Kickstarter: http://caseymalone.com/post/53339539674/this-is-not-fucking-harmless

Kickstarter’s apology for allowing it: http://www.kickstarter.com/blog/we-were-wrong

Ctrl+Alt+Del just posted this comic http://www.cad-comic.com/cad/20130621 , and I’ve seen a bunch of people I respect badmouth/stop reading as a result.

Penny Arcade had the dickwolves thing: http://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2010/8/11/ , backlash to that here: http://debacle.tumblr.com/post/3041940865/the-pratfall-of-penny-arcade-a-timeline , and then recently this thing happened: http://www.uproxx.com/gammasquad/2013/06/your-guide-to-the-most-recent-penny-arcade-controversy/ and people I respect have bailed on them in turn.

So, I’m coming at this from an angle of “I am a big free speech advocate”, and I think there’s some kernel of value in the dickwolves strip, and I think that even if boycotting Penny Arcade as a result is the right thing to do we are making a sacrifice to do it. That said, it might be the right thing to do, and boycotting a thing is very different from top-down government censorship. The point as I see it is actually less to suppress the idea being boycotted and more to generate conversation (just like this) about it.

I’m not going to be the most compelling orator on this subject, ‘cause my answer to just about everything is going to be “maybe” and “I don’t know”. I’m pretty confident that there is merit to most perspectives on this issue, and that all of them are at least partially wrong.

Here’s a fact: Slavery existed in the United States in 1800 because people communicated their belief that slavery was not evil to each other. On some scale, the notion that “hurting people in X way is acceptable” can be transmitted from person to person and will manifest in actual behavior. During that time period, that idea was not transmitted through mass media, so this doesn’t prove mass media is a vector for this stuff, but those ideas exist/spread/have power.

School shooters are probably motivated by other school shootings a lot of the time: http://www.upworthy.com/how-the-media-coverage-of-mass-shootings-makes-everything-worse

I was just hired at a major IT company and in my class of 23 hires there were six women. That number was unusually high. So, women tend not to go into IT and the reason for that is not that women are biologically less suited for it, so it has to be cultural. It happens because the road to IT for women involves being treated differently than men in some way, and that treatment results from ideas people have. All the people involved didn’t have the idea independently, so it probably spread among them via communication. Maybe all that communication took the form of “I witnessed another person behave a certain way IRL and when I was put in the same situation and didn’t know what to do, I fell back on what I’d seen before.” and maybe none of it happened via mass media… but probably not.

Censorship doesn’t solve the problem; among other problems, censorship is just too hard and too leaky. Sons of plantation owners are going to figure out about slavery, even if you do your very best to conceal it from them. So what you want to do is expose sons of plantation owners to more media that says “Slavery is evil” than they see that says “Slavery is good”, and maybe they become Union soldiers instead of Confederate soldiers. Now that slavery is a solved issue (well… not quite, but it’s not as bad as it was. Let’s pretend it is for argument), we can enjoy Sonnet 57 or some other really old work that happens to have some slavery-accustomed mindsets embedded in it without having to worry about slavery mindset. It isn’t hurting anybody anymore, ‘cause those issues aren’t relevant right now. And it definitely has redeeming merit! It’s friggin’ Shakespeare. So we don’t want the world to contain less Shakespeare. Furthermore, there’s no way to tell Shakespeare “Write something that has all of the merits of Sonnet 57 with none of the downside.”. He wouldn’t know how to do it and neither would anybody else. That creative value is super tightly tangled with the context it exists in, which happens to include slavery. So…

Frigg, I dunno. Ideas do create harmful behaviour, harmful behaviour should be suppressed, problematic creative works have value and abandoning them has a cost… somewhere we need to balance cultural progress with social justice. I don’t know exactly how the ideas that create harmful behaviour propagate (so I don’t know how best to stop them), and I don’t know where that balance is. I’m pretty confident that it needs to be struck, though.

-Jenna Magius

myquietrage:

not only are the pictures flawless,

but the vinyl selection.

itswalky:

paulftompkins:

WILL WE EVER COME TO A DECISION ON ME? #superaustin

Man, they think you are SUPER bald, dude.

More like APPAULING, amirite?
(I don’t even know what this is)

itswalky:

paulftompkins:

WILL WE EVER COME TO A DECISION ON ME? #superaustin

Man, they think you are SUPER bald, dude.

More like APPAULING, amirite?

(I don’t even know what this is)